SIVC researchers are interested in documenting and better understanding how social innovation and social entrepreneurship skills are being taught, as well as the characteristics and pathways of students who participate in social innovation and social entrepreneurship courses, programs and extra-curricular activities.

In September 2015, SIVC researchers are launching a two-phased research study.

We are actively recruiting other colleges and universities from Ontario and other parts of Canada to collaborate on this study. Please contact Carrie Wright at cwright@wlu.ca if you would like more information about this research or to indicate your school’s interest in participating in the project.

Part one of the project is a study of pedagogical approaches to social innovation and social entrepreneurship. The goals of the study are to document ‘what’ and ‘how’ social innovation and social entrepreneurship skills, values and competencies are being taught with a particular interest in how pedagogical approaches differ by institution and/or the program’s home faculty.

The data for this part of the project includes a) analysis of available documentation (e.g. website content, course syllabi) related to social innovation and social entrepreneurship courses, programs and extra-curricular supports and activities; and b) in-person interviews with a minimum of three social innovation and social entrepreneurship leaders (e.g. home faculty’s dean, lead/senior faculty member, etc).

Part two of the project is a survey of students participating in social innovation and social entrepreneurship programming. A survey package will collect information about students’ demographics, education, career goals, characteristics (e.g. problem solving approach, risk tolerance, etc) and perceived learning outcomes. The survey package will take approximately 20-30 minutes to complete.

As part of the student survey package, students will be asked to provide their consent for the collection of academic records (e.g. courses completed, grades) and follow-up surveys upon graduation and two and five years post-graduation. The longitudinal student project, coupled with the pedagogical data will allow the research team to explore relationships between pedagogical approaches, student characteristics and success in social innovation and social entrepreneurship related activities after graduation.

For more information, please contact:
Carrie Wright, PhD
SIVC Research Associate
cwright@wlu.ca